28 January 2016

Victorian Texting Gloves

 Here is the much sought-after glove pattern. Enjoy. 

Victorian Texting Gloves



Yarn: 4 oz. worsted weight (I used Red Heart Super Saver)

Hook size: F (or whatever size you need for approximate gauge, adjustments may need to be made for hand size)

Gauge: 5 sc = 1 inch

basic stitches:
single crochet (sc)                                 
double crochet (dc)                               
slip stitch (sl st)                                     
chain stitch (ch) 

advanced skills:
increasing (inc)
decreasing (dec)
in back loop only (blo)                                      

Cuff

You will begin the cuff by crocheting ribs (2 rows of single crochet = 1 rib)

Chain 16 loosely
Row 1) sc in 2nd chain from the hook and in each chain across, ch 1, turn (15 sc)
Row 2-25) in blo, sc in each stitch across, ch 1, turn (15 sc)
Row 26) in blo, sc in each stitch across, ch 1, do not finish off
sl st together row 26 and beginning chain to form a cuff. The joining of row 26 and the beginning chain will become the “seam.”

The cuff is now worked on both ends. You will first work on the bottom part of the cuff, crocheting around.

The rest of the cuff and glove are crocheted in both loops. The gloves are crocheted in rows, not in the round, meaning you end each row with a slip stitch to the first stitch in that row. You do not turn the work at the end of a row.

Row 1) chain 1, sc 1 in each row end (two sc in each rib), sl st to 1st sc (26 sc)
Row 2 & 3) chain 1, sc in same stitch and in each stitch around, sl st to 1st sc (26 sc) 
Row 4) (inc row) chain 1, 2 sc in same stitch, sc in next 7 stitches, 2 sc in next stitch, sc in next 8 stitches, 2 sc in next stitch, sc in next 7 stitches, 2 sc in the last stitch, sl st to 1st sc. (30 sc)
Row 5) (inc row) chain 1, sc in same stitch and in the next 11 stitches, 2 sc in next stitch, sc in next 11 stitches, 2 sc in next stitch, sc in last 5 stitches, sl st to first sc (32 sc)
Row 6) chain 3, 4 dc in same stitch, skip next stitch, sc in next stitch, skip next stitch, (5 dc in next stitch, skip next stitch, sc in next stitch, skip next stitch) repeat around cuff, sl st to 1st stitch and finish off. (40 dc, 8 sc)

You will now work the top of the cuff and continue with the rest of the glove.

Find the seam on the cuff (where you joined row 26 to beginning chain). Join yarn with a sc on the top side of cuff at the seam. The yarn must be attached here, so the “seam” will be in the palm of the glove.

Row 1) sc 1 stitch in each row end (two sc in each rib) around top of cuff, sl st to 1st sc (26 sc)
Row 2) chain 1, sc in same stitch and in each stitch around, join with sl st to 1st sc. (26 sc)
Row 3) (inc row) chain 1, 2 sc in same stitch, sc in the next 10 stitches, 2 sc in next stitch, sc in next 10 stitches, 2 sc in next stitch, sc in last 3 stitches, sl st to 1st sc (29 sc) 
Row 4) chain 1, sc in each stitch, sl st to 1st sc (29 sc)
Row 5) (inc row) chain 1, sc in same stitch, 2 sc in next sc, sc in next 9 stitches, 2 sc in next stitch, sc in next 9 stitches, 2 sc in next sc, sc in last 7 stitches, sl st to 1st sc (32 sc)
Row 6- 9) chain 1, sc in each sc, sl st to 1st sc. (32 sc)

The next section is a little tricky because there is now a distinction between left and right gloves. There are changes in rows 10, 13, and 14 depending on which glove you are working on.

Row 10) (Left glove only) chain 1, sc in same stitch, sc in next 5 stitches, chain 6, skip next 6 stitches on row 9 sc in next 20 stitches, sl st to 1st sc (26 sc, 6 chains)
Row 10) (Right glove only) chain 1, sc in same stitch and in next 22 stitches, chain 6 skip next 6 stitches on row 9, sc in the last 3 stitches, sl st to first sc (26 sc, 6 chains)
Row 11) chain 1 sc in same stitch and in each sc and chain around, sl st to 1st sc (32 sc)
Row 12) chain 1, sc in same stitch and in each stitch around, sl st to 1st sc (32 sc)
Row 13) (Left glove only) (dec row) chain 1, sc in same stitch and in next 5 stitches, (dec over next 2 sc) 3 times, sc in last 20 sc, sl st to 1st sc (29 sc) 
Row 13) (Right glove only) (dec row) chain 1, sc in same stitch and in the next 23 stitches, (decrease over next 2 sc) 3x, sc in last 2 stitches, sl st to 1st sc (29 sc)
Row 14) (Left glove only) (dec row) chain 1, sc in same stitch and next 7 sc, dec over next 2 stitches, sc in last 19 stitches, sl st to 1st sc (28 sc)
Row 14) (Right glove only) (dec row) chain 1, sc in same stitch and next 25 stitches, decrease over next 2 stitches, sc in last stitch, sl st to 1st sc (28 sc)
Row 15-16) chain 1, sc in each stitch, sl st to 1st sc (28 sc)
Row 17) chain 3, 2 dc in same stitch, skip next stitch, sc in next stitch, skip next stitch, (3 dc in next stitch, skip stitch, sc in next stitch, skip stitch), repeat around, sl st to beginning stitch, finish off.

Thumb

Row 1) join yarn with sl st on palm side of thumb opening. Sc 12 stitches evenly around thumb opening, sl st to 1st sc. (12 sc)
Row 2 - 5) chain 1, sc in same stitch and in each stitch around, sl st to 1st sc. (12 sc)
At the end of row 5, finish off. 

The pattern can be altered in many ways. The cuff can be shortened by using just the ribbing portion of the pattern. (But that is not very Victorian!) The cuff can be lengthened by adding more rows of single crochets to the top portion of the cuff pattern, creating a more elegant evening glove. When the gloves are completed as designed, the cuffs can be rolled down for more versatility. Add buttons and other embellishments for a more personalized glove. Use your imagination and explore the possibilities.

© 2011 by Catherine DePasquale

26 January 2016

My Past Crochet Designs

It seems that you cannot escape your past.

Five years ago I designed crochet patterns and offered them for free on Ravelry. For those of you who are not familiar with Ravelry, it is an online community for knitters and crocheters.

Back then, I designed three patterns for fingerless mitts. I called them Victorian Texting Gloves, Regency Texting Gloves, and Medieval Texting Gloves.

When I was laid off from my job in 2013, my life took a completely different direction. I was no longer in the business of designing crochet patterns, which was always just a hobby. My mind turned to more serious things, and I took some freelance jobs as a proofreader, while working a part time job. Eventually, that led me into writing novels. And I think I was meant to do that all along—write.

These days I crochet a lot less, and I don’t design patterns at all. There just isn’t enough time for everything.

But . . . requests for these crochet patterns keep popping up.

People track me down though my blog or Facebook or Google+ or wherever and ask if I am the person who designed the Victorian Texting Gloves pattern.

Well, I am, and I have decided to offer the pattern here on my blog for anyone who wants it.

It is a simple pattern, written for beginners.

I don’t quite get all the fuss over this pattern, but later in the week, I will post it.  

05 January 2016

My New Year's Resolution

I came across this quote a few weeks ago. It just so happens that it is a quote from my favorite actor. I have admired this actor since I was about twelve years old.

I remember the first time I saw him. He was in a made-for-television movie called The Lindbergh Kidnapping Case (1976). He played the role of Bruno Hauptmann, the accused kidnapper and murderer of the infant son of aviator Charles Lindbergh. I found myself fascinated by how he played the role. I remember watching the courtroom scenes in awe of him.

Then came more movie roles in Victory at Entebbe, Audrey Rose, A Bridge Too Far, Magic, The Elephant Man, and then his most famous role of Hannibal Lecter in The Silence of the Lambs. By the time The Silence of the Lambs was released (1992), Anthony Hopkins was a household name, but I still remember The Lindbergh Kidnapping Case and the first time I saw him. Call me crazy, but I still think that role was one of his very best.

So when I saw this quote, it stuck with me. I began analyzing it, and coming from someone like Sir Anthony Hopkins, it made me think about it even more. And the more I thought about it, the more I realized it just might hold the key to how I want to approach 2016. 

On the surface his quote sounds arrogant, but it is actually a sign of humility. And that is what I aim to work on this New Year—humility.

Here is the quote:

"My philosphy is: It's none of my business what people say of me and think of me. I am what I am and I do what I do. I expect nothing and accept everything. And I makes life so much easier." --Anthony Hopkins

Whenever I begin to worry over what he thinks or what she thinks, and I must confess, I am dogged by this in so many areas of my life, I will try to remember what Sir Anthony says, “It’s none of my business . . . I am what I am.” Mother Teresa said something very similar . . . “If you are humble nothing will touch you, neither praise nor disgrace, because you know what you are.”

And that is what I intend to work on this coming year—humility—and to know what I am.

I especially like the last part of his quote, “I expect nothing and accept everything.” I think what he is actually saying is whatever we receive is a gift anyway.

And Sir Anthony Hopkins was born on December 31, 1937—a New Year’s Eve baby. My favorite actor was born on New Year’s Eve, so I can’t think of a better way to start the New Year than to adopt his philosophy.